Rapid Eye Movement During Meditation: All You Need to Know

Do you know what rapid eye movement is? It’s a phenomenon that occurs during sleep and is responsible for the dream state.

But did you know that rapid eye movement can also occur during meditation?

In this blog post, we will discuss rapid eye movement, what causes it, and how it affects your meditation practice.

We will also provide tips on dealing with rapid eye movement if it becomes a problem for you. Stay tuned!

What Is Rapid Eye Movement During Meditation?

Rapid eye movement, or REM, is a normal part of the sleep cycle. However, during meditation, this natural process can be disruptive.

This is perfectly normal and there’s no need to be alarmed. In fact, rapid eye movement during meditation can be a sign that you’re reaching a deeper level of relaxation.

However, if other symptoms like dizziness or nausea accompany rapid eye movement, it may indicate that you’re overstimulated.

In this case, it’s best to take a meditation break and return when you’re feeling better.

How Does Rapid Eye Movement During Meditation Affect Your Practice?

Before we dive in, let’s get one thing straight: there’s no right or wrong way to meditate.

Whether sitting upright with your eyes closed, lying down with your eyes open, or walking around with your eyes open, the goal is simply to focus on the present moment.

And while there are many different techniques and methods you can use to help you focus, one particular method that’s gained popularity in recent years is Rapid Eye Movement (REM) meditation.

REM meditation is a type of mindfulness practice that involves moving your eyes quickly from side to side while remaining aware of your surroundings.

Some people find that this technique helps them focus and become more present, preventing them from getting lost in their thoughts. Others find that it makes them feel more relaxed and less anxious.

So what does the science say about REM meditation?

There’s still research on its effectiveness, but preliminary studies suggest that it may be helpful for those who struggle with anxiety and stress.

One study found that people who practiced REM meditation for 10 minutes per day over the course of four weeks reported feeling more calm and relaxed than those who didn’t practice any form of meditation at all.

Another study found that people who practiced REM meditation had lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol in their saliva than those who didn’t practice any form of meditation.

What Causes Rapid Eye Movement During Meditation?

There are a few things that can cause rapid eye movement during meditation:

You’re new to meditation:

If you’re new to meditation, your brain is still adjusting to the practice.

As you become more comfortable with meditation, the rapid eye movement will likely stop.

You’re trying too hard:

Meditation is meant to be a relaxing experience. If you’re trying too hard to achieve a certain state, it can actually have the opposite effect.

Instead of forcing yourself, just let go and see what happens.

You are overstimulated:

As we mentioned before, rapid eye movement can be a sign that you’re overstimulated.

If you’re feeling dizzy or nauseous, it’s best to take a break.

How to Deal With Rapid Eye Movement During Meditation´╝č

When your mind is focused on a single point, the rapid movement of your eyes can cause distraction and make it difficult to maintain your concentration. There are a few things you can do to deal with this issue.

If rapid eye movement during meditation is becoming a problem for you, there are a few things you can do:

Take breaks:

If you find rapid eye movement interferes with your meditation, take breaks as needed. This will help you avoid overstimulation and allow you to come back feeling refreshed.

Focus on your breath:

One of the best ways to deal with rapid eye movement is to focus on your breath. This will help you stay present and in the moment, despite any distractions.

Use Mask:

You can also try using an eye pillow or mask to block out external stimuli.

Talk to a doctor:

If other symptoms like dizziness or nausea accompany rapid eye movement, it’s best to talk to a doctor. They can help you determine if an underlying medical condition needs to be treated.

Finally, remember that REM is a normal part of the sleep cycle and it’s nothing to be concerned about.

With a little practice, you’ll be able to maintain your focus and enjoy the benefits of meditation.